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Jan 27, 2009

Jagannath Temple - Puri Orissa Part - I

View of the Dol-Mandapa, Puri from outside the exterior wall
Photographed : 1890
Photograph of the Dol-Mandapa in the Jagannatha Temple Complex at Puri, from the Archaeological Survey of India Collections, taken by Poorno Chander Mukherji in the 1890s. Puri in Orissa, is one of the four traditional pilgrimage centres for Hindus, and the centre of the cult of Jagannatha, a form of Krishna. The main shrine, with a towered sanctuary and mandapa with a pyramidal roof, is attributed to Anantavarman Chodaganga of the Eastern Ganga dynasty (r.1077-1147). Other mandapas were added in the 13th and 15th Centuries. The rectangular complex has many other minor shrines and is within a high double-walled enclosure with four gates at the cardinal points. This massive free-standing stone torana or hindola (swing) has beams ending in carved figures of seated lions. Its precise location is unidentified. The wall in front of it is decorated with sculptural panels set in niches and a large carved elephant.

The Lion Gateway (Singha Dwara) of the Jagannath Temple
Photographed : 1870
Photograph of the Lion Gateway (Singhadwara) of the Jagannatha Temple at Puri, taken by an unknown photographer around 1870. Puri, a town on the east coast of India in the state of Orissa.


Minor temples at south side of Jagannath Temple
Photographed:1890
Photograph of the minor temples at south side of Jagannatha Temple complex at Puri, from the Archaeological Survey of India Collections, taken by Poorno Chander Mukherji in the 1890s.

General view from the south-east of the Jagannath Temple
Photographed : 1892
General view from the south-east of the Jagannatha Temple, Puri from the Archaeological Survey of India Collections, taken by William Henry Cornish in c.1892.

Entrance to the Jagannatha Temple
Photographed: 1865
Photograph of the Lion Gateway (Singhadwara) of the Jagannatha Temple at Puri from the Archaeological Survey of India Collections: India Office Series (volume 21, 'a' numbers), taken by Henry Dixon in the early 1860s.