Old Indian Photos

Dec 24, 2008

King George V's Hunting in Nepal in December 1911 Part II

Tethered rhinoceros (Rhinoceros unicornis) with caged deer in the background. Possibly part of the gift of a collection of animals indigenous to Nepal which the Maharaja had presented to [King George V]. This collection consisted of over seventy varieties, ranging from a young elephant and a rhinoceros calf to the wild ass of the Tibetan border, also the rare shou, which [subsequently] with many others of the animals which survived the journey to England [could be found] in the gardens of the Zoological Society in London. 1d Historical record of the Imperial visit to India, 1911, p.231.

George V stands in his howdah. Other members of the hunting party watch from behind.

Goats with handlers on the banks of the Rapti. Possibly part of the gift of a "... collection of animals indigenous to Nepal which the Maharaja had presented to [King George V]. This collection consisted of over seventy varieties, ranging from a young elephant and a rhinoceros calf to the wild ass of the Tibetan border, also the rare shou, which [subsequently] with many others of the animals which survived the journey to England [could be found] in the gardens of the Zoological Society in London." - Historical record of the Imperial visit to India, 1911, p. 231.

Hunting party on elephants with slain tiger. The "ring" is a method of hunting peculiar to Nepal. The hunters mounted on elephants form a "ring" and move in on their quarry, which has previously been stalked and enclosed in the area surrounded by the ring. There were a total of 39 tigers killed during this hunt. The Maharaja of Nepal stands in his howdah on the left, and George V stands in his in the centre.

Hunting party on elephants at the edge of a river. River is probably the Rapti. The hunting parties camped on the banks of this river during the hunt.

Hunters with slain rhinoceros. There were a total of 18 rhinoceroses killed during this hunt. George V sits in his howdah on the right, and the Maharaja of Nepal looks down from his howdah on the left.

Mahouts (elephant handlers) and shikaris (hunters) on elephants forming a "ring". The "ring" is a method of hunting peculiar to Nepal. The hunters mounted on elephants form a "ring" and move in on their quarry, which has previously been stalked and enclosed in the area surrounded by the ring. "The [shooting] ring formed on [25th of December, 1911] was the largest during the whole visit, the number of elephants engaged being just under six hundred." Historical record of the Imperial visit to India, 1911, p.232.

Hunting party on elephants fording a stream

Sentries guard the gate to George V's camp. The bungalow, built especially for the King, is on the left.

Tiger crossing a stream. Historical record of the Imperial visit to India, 1911, p.230, notes that [on the first day of the hunt, 18th December] " ... the first tiger [was] shot by His Majesty in mid-air as it was leaping a small stream." There were a total of 39 tigers killed during this hunt.

Yaks? with three Nepalis

Hunting party with George V and Maharaja of Nepal. Maharaja is in his howdah on the left, and George V is in his on the right.

George V stands in his howdah. Other members of the hunting party watch from behind.

Maharaja of Nepal meets two Nepali veterans. The Maharaja of Nepal, with one Englishman and one Nepali (his son?), meets two Nepali veterans on the bank of the Rapti. On 27 December, "His Majesty ... received two Mutiny veterans of the Nepalese Army", Historical record of the Imperial visit to India, 1911, p.232.


View Also:
Part I
Part III
Part IV

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